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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 5
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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am EST
of these things give us a predisposition. that does not mean we are going to get the disease. the environment, behavior, social aspects of life, all of these things influence it. it is the interplay, especially for more common diseases, hypertension, diabetes. we know that there is an interplay. genetic predisposition but in terminal contributions. -- but environmental contributions, what you are eating, how much you exercise. i want to emphasize that genomics is a key part of this puzzle but it is not the only part. host: from maryland, william is joining us. dr. eric green at nih. -- i wasy question is in vietnam and i can't malaria. i stayed in the field house for three months. when i came back to fort brag, i had a relapse. i am having problems. i cannot hear that well. warts growing out of me. the va cut the amount. -- cut them out. what kind of side effect or long-term effect is this? host: can you adjust that? thet: dr. fauci would be expert on that. this is an infectious disease. i would refer you to the institute that he runs to get the sort of insight. what i will tell you to make t
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am EST
they originate in a wireline environment or not. i would say america' to is a wireline future. >> the future of communications industry with walter mccormick tonight on the communicators at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span two. >> "washington journal" continues. the: we are joined by executive director of the concorde coalition. thank you for joining us this morning. over the weekend it was reported that negotiators are getting closer to a budget deal. tell us what that looks like. >> it looks like what they're replace try to do is about two years worth of sequestration cuts, which was a lower level that went into effect earlier this year. they want to replace the savings so it would not add to the deficit by increasing some government fees and perhaps requiring higher contributions and maybe a workers 60 52 $7 billion deal. it would be an agreement on the level of discretionary spending or the appropriations bills for the next two years. is this a large or small deal? caller: this is not what you would call a brain -- a grand bargain. they deliberately set it pretty modest target. finding some of s
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 7:45am EST
president? quickly, given our media environment for one. it is pretty easy to write off a lame-duck president. highlighted another obstacle is facing in trying to dig out of -- perceptions are set. increasingly the closer we get to 2016 there are going to be -- they are going to be more and more fixed. is the biggest challenge the white house faces. tot: if you want to talk legacy -- about obama's legacy and how he's doing with these issues, specifically healthcare.gov, some of the criticism he has received, give us a call. guest: with the national security agency's eavesdropping ask posers your car he was saying here is not aware that the united states is eavesdropping on the german chancellor's personal cell phone. obviously the glitches to the health care website is another that he has acknowledged he was not prepared for. on their own, these may seem relatively minor, but added up you get the perception of a white house and a management team there that is trying to do a lot of different things at the same time and not speaking for the american people. he wasn't speaking for
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00am EST
or building a new plant. they will not take risks in an uncertain environment. host: the president delivered a speech calling for an increase in the minimum wage. says it makes more sense to invest in technology that would replace workers. guest: one of the classic arguments with minimum wage is it causes a transfer to more capital. others who have studied this it does not, partially because you need to look at who earns the minimum wage. you have a lot of folks in retail sectors, fast food restaurants. there is technology that could make a difference. but it is not the same thing as in manufacturing. most manufacturing workers e arn well above the minimum wage. it is unfortunate for families who lose their jobs to a machine that allows one worker to do the work of three. it is not necessarily because of minimum wage. host: you have stopped looking completely? caller: i just turned 60 years old. i have been looking for a position for about a year and a half. i do ecological research. i have been a university professor working with the federal government doing research. iwas employed for 10 y
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 7:00am EST
, the environment. thank you for saying that. about your time in the 1990s talking about this issue on the federal level. approval from big food companies and to what extent are they talking about genetically modified food or whatever the issue? guest: of course there are. the producers of genetically modified foods are rather floored by what is going on. there is an enormous grassroots movement to try to get a foods labeled. labeled.should be people want them labeled. in the early 1990s, it was people obvious that wanted these foods labeled. the industry was totally opposed to it and is still opposed to it. the examples in europe in which foods are labeled genetically modified, people do not care about the issue and they still buy them. if the industry is in trouble so muchuse there is grassroots opposition to what it is doing, i think the industry brought it on itself by not being transparent in the first place. transparency would have taken it a long way. there would have been people in the 1890s who would have refused to buy genetically modified foods. by this time, there would have been 20 ye
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5